JUAN GONZÁLEZ RÍOS

Juan González Ríos was born in 1928 and when he was nine years old he had already lost his father, who had been executed by Francoist forces, and two of his brothers, who had also been shot. The brother who was immediately above him in terms of age, and was in his teens, died because he had lent a pickaxe to those who were digging a trench in San José del Valle to defend the village after the military insurrection of 18th July. His father, Francisco, and mother María, loaded their possessions onto mules, gathered up the eight children that were left and took refuge in La Sauceda. They thought the uprising would be overcome within a short time, and order would be restored. They were wrong. Juan clearly remembers the day on which a plane dropped three bombs on the community, and how another three aircraft then filled the valley with terror. His father took the family into the mountains but decided to return to San José del Valle, thinking that the death of a son had already been punishment enough. He presented himself to the Guardia Civil, and he and his eldest son disappeared forever. His widow and sons suffered a post-war period full of privations and silence.

Juan González Ríos was born in 1928 and when he was nine years old he had already lost his father, who had been executed by Francoist forces, and two of his brothers, who had also been shot. The brother who was immediately above him in terms of age, and was in his teens, died because he had lent a pickaxe to those who were digging a trench in San José del Valle to defend the village after the military insurrection of 18th July. His father, Francisco, and mother María, loaded their possessions onto mules, gathered up the eight children that were left and took refuge in La Sauceda. They thought the uprising would be overcome within a short time, and order would be restored. They were wrong. Juan clearly remembers the day on which a plane dropped three bombs on the community, and how another three aircraft then filled the valley with terror. His father took the family into the mountains but decided to return to San José del Valle, thinking that the death of a son had already been punishment enough. He presented himself to the Guardia Civil, and he and his eldest son disappeared forever. His widow and sons suffered a post-war period full of privations and silence.